Category Archives: News

Keeping the Grounds

Trash on campus

Trash on campus

It is the Maintenance and Operations mission to try to keep a clean campus and a safe environment for students, faculty, and staff. Maintenance and Operations has a 15 hour work day. Some of their jobs include sending out a sweeper truck, sending out men with backpack blowers, and also sending a few men to pick up trash all over campus. They all manage to achieve cleaning the campus every day before 8 a.m. right before the students and faculty arrive at Chabot College.

So when I asked Cord Ozment, who is the Grounds Supervisor of the Maintenance and Operations department, “What is the greatest challenge for grounds keeping here at Chabot”? He stated that “We spend a lot of time cleaning up garbage like I said, fifteen hours a day. Five people. Every morning and then we go on to the mowing and the pruning. That’s the fun stuff. It’s the garbage in the morning that’s a hassle.”

M&O Sign

M&O Sign

Maintenance and Operations work very hard to keep this campus clean. Wouldn’t you agree that it is also the student’s job to keep the campus clean as well? Ozment stated that ”If we weren’t here for a couple of days, it’ be amazing how dirty this place would get”. So remember, the next time you finish a meal, throw away your trash and make Chabot College shine. This is a home for many students, and it is yours as well. Treat it like one.

I also inquired to Ozment about any plans in regards to the plants at Chabot College. They have been affected by the weather and construction which can get in the way of landscaping. Ozment replied, “We have plants going into dormancy, so it looks like they’re dying, but they’re not. They’re going to come right back.” Ozment followed with, “I work closely with the construction superintendent on the projects, and we’ll make a bullet point list as they start opening up some of these gardens and you’ll see at the end of the whole project, we’ll come through and start replanting these areas.”

Maintenance and Operations does a fantastic job of keeping the campus clean and safe. We shouldn’t take them for granted.

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Hayward Housing Crisis

On Tuesday, February 6th, Hayward City Council held a special meeting focused on the Hayward Housing crisis. Many renters are facing unlawful evictions and unexplainable rent increases as new management companies are capitalizing on the need for housing as a result of the tech industries new demand. Gentrification is happening now inside of our city; is it too late to respond accordingly?

At the meeting, rent control stabilized rent increases and development of affordable housing was discussed. There will be follow up discussion meeting being held on February, 26th at the Matt Jimenez Center at 28200 Ruus Rd. from 6-8PM. City Manager Kelly McAdoo and City Assistant Manager Kelly Hurtado shared a presentation on what is currently being done and what are some options are for the future.

“Section 8 of the Hayward Rent Stabilization Ordinance should be removed,” Hurtado stated. Referring to legislation that allows owners to “decontrol” units by paying a fee, allowing the property rent to be raised higher than 5% in one year.

Public comments dominated the meeting with at least 30 individuals opening their hearts and sharing frustrations.  One developer asked, “How can I build a 5-unit property for affordable housing when the city of Hayward charges $60,000 per unit before the cost of permits?”
There is a need for multiple solutions for all affected parties. Currently, the average rent in Hayward is affordable to those with an average income of nearly $80,000 when its citizens average about $45,000.

Residents like Maria Segura of the Aloha apartments on Jackson St, stated that she, “is now being charged utilities when she was gone for months and construction was constant.”
The company that owns Mrs. Segura’s apartment, has allegedly practiced unlawful evictions at another apartment, Solis Garden on Harder Rd. They are currently awaiting litigation with 3 remaining tenants.

City Council members Al Mendall and Francisco Zermeno were disgusted at the company that owns Aloha and Solis Garden Apartments. Zermeno asked several questions and shared ideas before putting a hand over his mouth as he said, “this is Shit!” Al Mendall blatantly states, “What the owners of the Aloha and Tiki (now Known as Solis) Gardens are doing is wrong!”

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History of Black History

Oh February, how we love you so. Winter is ending, birds are chirping and Black History Month is being celebrated. Although being Black is always something to be proud of and the culture should be praised year round, February is dubbed as the official Black History Month in the United States.

Dr. Carter G. Woodson, a Harvard Graduate from Virginia, is widely known as the “father of Black history.” Woodson, born December 19, 1875, couldn’t help but noticed the lack of proper representation (or representation at all) of Black culture in his US History studies. Determined for change and in an attempt to educate others on the impact of Black culture in our society, Woodson launched the Association for the Study of Negro Life in 1915. From this came the Journal of Black History (now known as the Journal of African American History), a publication that highlights the roles, importance, and history of Black people. His work brought in loads of support and encouragement, and in 1926 Woodson was able to organize the first-ever Negro History Week. This purposefully fell on the second week of February to celebrate both Frederick Douglass (former slave/national leader of the abolitionist movement) and President Abraham Lincoln’s birthdays. Woodson devoted his entire life to ensuring the presence of African American history in the United States. Sadly he died of a heart attack in 1950 before seeing his celebration go from a week to the entire month of February in 1976. However, Woodson left behind a legacy that goes hand in hand with the works of other astounding African American leaders.

Week one of February has been exciting as the celebration of Black history is in full effect all across the Bay Area. Celebrations and dedications have been held by the city of Hayward, Oakland and many more. Chabot’s Scholars of the African Diaspora (CSAD), a group of programs and organizations in place to promote the academic success of students of the African descent, has hosted motivational workshops and panel discussions all throughout campus. And not to mention we screamed Happy Birthday to Mrs. Rosa Parks as she would have turned 105 on February 4. Parks, of course, made history when she refused to give up her seat on the bus to a white man on December 1, 1955, in Montgomery, Alabama.Parks was arrested and tried for this event, but eventually made bailed and moved on to continue fighting against segregation and discrimination.

If you feel that you’ve missed out on the festivities, don’t worry! There is plenty more celebration to go around. Here at Chabot CSAD is hosting three more upcoming events including a “Get Out” film screening on the 15th, a Black Scholars Family Night on the 22nd, and an end of the month Carnival on the 27th. The Bay Area is jammed packed with events as well, most of which are free. For more information scan the code below for events around the Bay Area if you would like to join in on all the love. Also, tune into KTCH Channel 27, and catch an episode of Chabot News where Chabot’s Avier Brass will be doing weekly segments about culturally significant figures in Black history.

For more on Black History Month events in the bay area check Eventbrite.

DACA Update

DACA has once again been in the spotlight with it being the primary issue that lead to the government shutdown and potentially threatens another. DACA is an issue that is important to Chabot college due to us having a large population of Dreamer students. At the board of trustees recently declaring us a sanctuary campus like many other Californian campuses.
Chabot’s, status as a sanctuary campus means that we will not cooperate with Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) should they ask for records or attempt to apprehend a student on campus. This is made redundant by ICE’s policy of not apprehending people in “sensitive” areas such as schools and churches. Yet, under the Trump administration ICE has been much more proactive. According to The New York Times raiding a total of 98 7-Eleven’s in January resulting in 23 arrests.

In the short term, DACA recipients should have nothing to fear despite Attorney General Jeff Sessions announcing the end of DACA. The Chabot College Dream team recently sent out an email stating as of January 13, 2018, U. S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced it will again accept DACA renewal applications as a result of a recent order issued by a U.S. District Court.

Chabot has its own Dreamers Club that according to the group’s president Jacklen a first-year math major, “is to create awareness and support for undocumented people at chabot.” She went on to state the group provides scholarship information, guest speaker and group support for its members.

Chabot’s Dreamers club isn’t just for the undocumented, they accept allies as well. One such ally is Savannah a 1st-year business major. Savannah joined because “My friend was undocumented and a few of her family members and I knew of the fear and anxiety they face.”

President Donald Trump has stepped away from Mexico funding his border wall in the short term and sought to get the funding from Congress. But with Democrats opposed to constructing the wall along with any member of his party. President Trump has attempted to use DACA as leverage to strike a deal with Democrats. The disagreement lead to the first government shutdown with the ruling party holding the majority seats in Congress since Jimmy Carter.

Chabot Dreamer club meets on Thursdays at noon in room 506. DACAs future remains uncertain for the foreseeable future while both political parties seem to be unwilling to compromise.

Calculating Counseling

According to the Chabot website, we currently have 20 counselors available to the 13,875 registered students on campus. This number includes adjunct counselors and counselors assistants. Students have had to wait weeks, or longer, to see a counselor. Though satisfaction is reportedly moderate, suggestions for improvement have been made, and the need for additional resources is apparent.

Student Senate SSCC Student Trustee Juliet Garcia says, “I’ve always been in Puente. So I’ve never had to use the counseling in 700. Special program counseling is better because counselors in 700 give a lot of general information, they don’t have the time. Special program counselors really get to know you.”

Chabot’s Office of Institutional Research (OIR) coordinated by Dr. Carolyn Arnold, conducts a student satisfaction survey biannually. The results are based on a sample of our student population, 1,702 “student course enrollments,” providing 3 individual aspects of counseling in 2 different categories.

According to the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office website, cccco.edu, we have 13,875 students enrolled at Chabot College. The OIR survey sample results available online will indicate the opinions of just above 12% of our student population.

One category relevant to counseling was for the facilities. The other category was “experience and satisfaction with student services.” Facilities, “Bldg. 700 upstairs (Counseling, Career/Transfer Center, Special Programs),” collected 1,488 responses, totaling 71% either satisfied or very satisfied, 8% either dissatisfied or very dissatisfied and 21% neither dissatisfied or satisfied.

Within “experience and satisfaction with student services,” students were asked about, “Front Desk Counseling (quick counseling),” and, “Counseling Appointments.”

From the sample of a potential 12% of the student population, 75% were either satisfied or very satisfied, and 25% are not satisfied with their experience with counseling appointments. Out of the 1,679 students who answered this specific part of the survey, 22% have heard of but never been to a counseling appointment.

When asked about his experience with a counselor, Reid Alexander, a returning Chabot student says, “she was good…I didn’t follow her plan, that’s why I’m still here.”

SSCC President Zaheer Ebtikar, conscious of those he represents is aware that, “Many students aren’t able to capitalize on their education early enough because of the lack of counselor availability.”

Ebtikar, Alexander, and Garcia all reference the online option to get an appointment. Unfortunately, following the instructions on chabotcollege.edu to schedule an appointment, when instructed to, “Click on Find Appointments to select a date & time,” selecting “Find Appointments,” a new page loads displaying the message, “Appointments for the current allowable time frame are Filled.”

“We need more counselors, says President Ebtikar during the January 29 SSCC meeting, but with the deficit, there won’t be any money spent on additional counseling faculty for a while.”

Los Angeles Times Boycotts Disney

On November 3 Disney decided to stop conducting business with the Los Angeles Times for their “unfair business” reviews in the city of Anaheim, banning the publication from private screenings for the movie Thor Ragnarok.

According to the article published by the Los Angeles Times in September, Disney has not been paying their fair share to the city of Anaheim for Disneyland Park. The city of Anaheim has granted various bonds, rebates and tax shield to the park for years.

Disney supports and funds various aspects of Anaheim, including funding for the local police department. Even so, employees of the Disneyland Resort and the residents of Anaheim share the same concerns that Disney isn’t doing enough for the city.

After the article had been published, Disney stopped contacting the Los Angeles Times and banning them from private screenings of Disney’s recent box office hit, Thor Ragnarok. Despite this, the review was published on time.

Shortly after, many critics came out in support of the Los Angeles Times, including the LA Film Critics, the New York Film Critics Circle, the National Society of Film Critics and Ava DuVernay, who directed A Wrinkle in Time for Disney earlier this year. They all declined private screenings by Disney unless the ban was lifted and removed any Disney films from any of their year-end awards.

On November 7, Disney lifted the ban due to pressure from critics. The Los Angeles Times released a statement in the aftermath of the ban being lifted. “A powerful company punishing a news organization for a story they do not like is meant to have a chilling effect. This is a dangerous precedent and not at all in the public interest.

Chabot Gladiators reaches 1,000 Degrees

Chabot primarily serves innovative residents of Alameda County in the East Bay Area. Including the district communities of Castro Valley, San Leandro, San Lorenzo and Union City. Making it one of the leading diverse and cultivating institutions in the Bay Area.

Among the students that attend, nearly 1,000 degrees were awarded in the graduation year of 2016-2017. Exactly 998 degrees were awarded. Go Gladiators!

Dedicated to the Mission Statement as cited, “Chabot College is a public comprehensive community college that prepares students to succeed in their education, progress in the workplace, and engage in the civic and cultural life and the community.” And in the progression have shown the leading role in the local community college education.

Chabot College is known for being an institution for the commuting and busy student. Making it a well-appreciated school with thriving enrollment.

The last time this level of success was achieved was in the class year of 1993-1994. Where 1,000 degrees were earned.

As mentioned by Carolyn L. Arnold, Coordinator of Institutional Research, “transfer degrees (AA-T or AS-T) accounted for 45% of the increase, while a resurgence of AA and AS degrees contributed the rest. Either way, more and more students are earning degrees at Chabot.” AA-T being an Associates in Arts for Transfer and AS-T an Associates in Science for Transfer. As well as for AA and AS students who meet the general, major and unit requirements toward their field.

Graduates of the performing year, such as Florito Maniego believe that “a lot more students are more motivated to get better careers or further their education. A lot of students also attend Chabot to transfer, and they increase their chances of admission if they pursue a degree.”

Chabot College is classified as Degree-granting, associate’s and certificates school by Carnegie Classification.

Sanctuary

December 5 marked the victory in a seven-month fight for Chabot to become a sanctuary campus. Chabot’s and LPC’s respective sanctuary campus resolutions were passed with a single amendment to each. A remaining concern is the Chabot Academic Senate’s vote of no confidence with Chancellor Jackson.
 
In response to Chabot vote of no confidence for Chancellor Jackson, the Board presented a “statement of support from the Chabot Los Positas Community College District Board of Trustees.” Secretary Gin continues, “the Chabot Los Positas Board of Trustees wished to express its support of Chancellor Jannett Jackson in light of the recent vote of no confidence for Chabot college. The Board takes the concerns of the Chabot College Academic Senate seriously …”
 
Jennifer Lange, a faculty member at Chabot, had this to say about the Boards statement, “I was actually very disappointed to hear, right before the public comments session, that the board has decided to put out a statement of support for the Chancellor without hearing all of our reasoning for doing the vote in the first place … and coming to talk with us …”
 
Though this concern remains, the highlight of the night is the unanimous passing of agenda item 9.1 making Chabot a sanctuary campus. Before the vote, trustee Vecchiarelli makes clear, “I’m all in favor of the sanctuary resolution. However … we have to have procedures that could protect our students.” Trustee Maduli, after making a motion to amend the resolution by removing support of, “legal council, and tuition assistance,” which was voted on unanimously to be removed, expressed, “ I fully support this resolution.” Trustee Randolph, “I am in favor of this resolution.” During the vote, Trustee Dvorsky shared, “It’s the right thing to do.”
 
Following the adoption of the Sanctuary Campus resolutions by a unanimous vote, Chabot students and faculty members celebrated in song right outside the boardroom, singing Bob Marley’s “One Love,” and what seems to be a campus theme song by Chabot’s own Justice Arts Collective, “Wake Up, Wake Up.” The crowd roars, “wake up, wake up, yo, it’s time to wake up. It ain’t too late, too late. It’s time to wake up!”
 
Thursday, December 7 at three in the afternoon There was a Sanctuary Campus party with live music from the Justice Arts Collective. This served as a fitting way to recognize the way the entire campus came together in unity and solidarity, motivating many people, students, and others, to become involved deeply with their communities for the first time.

Wasting Water

For almost two months now, the area between building 1900 and 2000 is blocked off due to heavy leakage in the piping located below the pathways between the buildings. With over 1,000 gallons a day spilling out and the source is still unknown. “As you guys have seen, the leaks are very ugly right now.” states Walter “Waltz” Blevins, director of Maintenance and Operations in a board meeting in November.

According to Waltz, the leak was 5,000 gallons a day before the excavations, with it patched up after it finally surfaced. Though a pesky leak of over 1,000 gallons still runs loose somewhere on campus.

“Right now the guys are jackhammering through, 4 feet of concrete,” Waltz explains. “Because the leak is encapsulated in concrete, we won’t find it that way.”

The source of the leakage is still a mystery, though it’s suspected it’s in the T-in line that branches off toward the bookstore. This makes it harder to find because of the over 4 feet of concrete above it.

The issue was first brought to light in an email sent out by Charles Bender to the campus on October 10, in which he stated that there was a major leak in the hydronic piping between the 1900 and 2000 buildings. The project now seeks to demolish the pathways to excavate the underlying pipes to inspect them for damages and to repair them if need be.

On Friday, December 1, the water was closed off for half the campus buildings to make repairs, though it is unclear whether it was due in part to the water leaks.

The pipe leak raises concerns at Chabot; the piping affects the AC system on campus and the water flow on campus. The new water bottle stations around campus are affected too, with two stations having to be pulled off the water supply due to the leakage.

“It doesn’t affect me as much, but as a student who frequently goes to the STEM center, it can be quite annoying sometimes having to reroute my direction all because of the construction.” Michael Acholonu, a student who spends lots of his time on campus, says, “It also gets very annoying hearing the machinery from across campus, combined with the jackhammers going off on the other end while they try to remove the support beams, though I’m glad they’re addressing the issue now as opposed to just leaving it there.” He then added, “It’s also an eyesore for anybody visiting our campus, practically seeing the entire place under construction doesn’t help us with first impressions.”

Human Trafficking

Rape culture is defined as, “a society or environment whose prevailing social attitudes have the effect of normalizing or trivializing sexual assault and abuse,” by Oxford dictionary. Documentaries like “Surviving International Boulevard” highlight the all too real problem of human trafficking, including the trafficking of children for sex in the Bay Area, in particular, Oakland, is a hub.

Santa Cruz Police Chief Andy Mills says, “It’s the new crack cocaine.” The FBI identifies the San Francisco Bay Area as one of the highest-intensity child sex trafficking areas in the country. “84 minors were recovered, and 120 traffickers were arrested as part of Operation Cross Country XI, a nationwide effort focusing on underage human trafficking that ran from October 12-15, 2017,” according to FBI officials in the San Francisco media office.

Motivating, Inspiring, Supporting & Serving Sexually Exploited Youth, or MISSY, “has devoted its energy to the heartbreaking epidemic of commercial sexual exploitation by supporting and advocating for youth who are victims of child sex trafficking.”

Survivors Healing, Advising and Dedicated to Empowerment, or the S.H.A.D.E. project is, “an organization that’s all about survivors who are against gender violence, social injustice, and sexual exploitation. S.H.A.D.E is a survivor run consulting project coming together to speak out for survivors and to work with other community groups, agencies, and governmental offices about survivor issues.

Heather Monasky says, “People in prostitution lack basic freedom: freedom over their bodies, freedom to manage their own lives, and freedom to live without fear.” Ashleigh M. Kline, the writer of “The Fallacy of Free Will in Prostitution: Encouraging Prostitution Reform to Prevent the Repeated Victimization of Vulnerable Persons,” explains, “there is no free will or choice in prostitution, and a prostitute is always an object and a victim.”

Resources are available, and survivors are out there looking to provide information and assistance. If you see something, say something.

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