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Soccer Season Canceled

This year both Chabot College’s men’s and women’s soccer seasons were canceled on Sep. 20.

Athletic Director Jeff Druin explained why the season was shut down before it could begin. “For the women’s team, they did not have enough players to field a team as for the men’s team, we had 15 players, which is enough to compete. When we ran their eligibility, we discovered that six student-athletes were academically ineligible, reducing the roster number to nine eligible athletes, which is not enough to field a team.”

Jeff continued, “After having a conversation with Dr. Cooks, Vice President of Instructions, we made the decision to give the team some time to fix the situation. Shortly after, we had to make the difficult decision to cancel the season.”

Photography by Mike Leonor

 Student athlete Christopher Mercado shared his feelings regarding the season’s cancellation. “I think it’s sad. We put our all into this, and it was just taken from us out of nowhere. We’re really hoping there’s a better future for the sport at this college.” 

In addition to the season’s cancellation, the men’s longtime soccer coach, Tony Igwe, announced that he would be stepping down from his position and retiring. “I just put in my resignation today. I’m gonna miss it. I just talked to the players. I will miss them.”

Jeff shared his thoughts about Tony’s departure. “The week he was hired as the soccer coach was the same week that I started in a full-time position here at Chabot. We worked together for many years. 22 years, to be exact.”

Jeff added, “Tony has inspired a lot of young soccer players. He has shown great care for all the student-athletes that played for him. I hope this next chapter in his life will be good for him, and I wish him nothing but the best.”

Tony hopes that the athletic department will be able to add more support for the next head coach. “They just need to be behind them. Go to local schools and recruit, which I used to do. They just need to help the soccer department as much as they help Football and Baseball.” As for the vacant coaching position, Jeff explained that the department is hard at work in identifying new candidates to fill the role for the next year’s season.

Looking back at his time at Chabot, Tony is very grateful for what he was able to accomplish with his student-athletes and the bonds that he was able to build with them. “I know about five of my players now who have masters and PHDs, and they call me all the time and say, “coach, you remember when you brought me into your office, and you gave me a pep talk? That changed me.”

Tony added, “My job was to see these players move forward in life. I have a bachelors in physical education and I have a master’s in psychology, and I got my coaching credentials. I did everything to make sure that I stood out and that my players would do well. My intentions were always to push them forward toward a four-year university and a possible scholarship to play D1 soccer.”

Tony retires with an incredible career consisting of representing the Nigerian National Team in the 1968 Olympics, captaining his country during World Cup qualifying matches, and winning three national titles for the University of San Francisco. He also coached at the next level for Stanford University’s women’s soccer team.

The Bay Bay Cafe: A Chabot College Original Sitcom

By: Mike Leonor

Entertainment Writer

Are you looking for something new to watch that isn’t a limited series having lawyers twerk for your amusement? Catch the original sitcom that was produced, written, and shot by your own Chabot staff and students. The full play was directed and showrun by Chabot professor Linda Amayo-Hassan. Along with the students in the play, Professor Linda has written about the life of college students all hanging out at their own fictional coffee shop named “The Bay Bay Cafe.” 

This production is 3 episodes with a full star-studded cast. It showcases its own original characters facing the trials of college academic life and how it affects their personal lives. All the staff at “The Bay Bay Cafe” are students that play Chabot College students from their interpersonal relationships to the friendships they make at this cafe. Each character has a story and lesson that may be similar to your own experience or journey.  Stories Co-written by the students here at the school performed and acted so you can vicariously see and feel what they may have experienced.

This series sitcom project took a whole 6 weeks from the writers room all the way to filming production. “The Bay Bay Cafe” crew was outstanding in producing and creating something within the limited time schedules. To produce this sitcom at a televised level it took the work and effort of both the Theater department and Television studio here at Chabot to revamp the space of the 1200 buildings small theater to look like a fullfeldge off-site television studio.

Professor Linda Amayo-Hassan stated “ Sujoy Sarkar (Senior Technician) and I are trying to do more filming and projects with the theater and Television station. Prior to this work we had already done podcasts about theater two or three different podcasts or recordings that just seemed to make up the stories for this play and other projected works. This opened up an opportunity for me to take a more active role in the writing, overseeing, and carefully shaping the work.” From podcast dialog to being written down as a script from finally being shot and produced it is nice to see a project go off the ground floor from being an idea and becoming a full fledged recorded sitcom.

The people that helped produce this project want you as a student to hear their stories about academic life as a student living here in the bay area. They also want you to understand an international student’s perspective making their way through a new environment. This sitcom is the first performance by some of our Chabot students so make sure to show some support and watch “The Bay Bay Cafe” when it premieres  on November 24 and 25 on Youtube or on Comcast Channel 27.

Hayward Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month

Downtown Hayward hosted their 12th Mariachi Festival on Sep. 29 in honor of Hispanic Heritage month. This family affair brought traditional dances, music, and overall spirit to warm the hearts of Bay Area attendees. 

The festival paid particular homage to Mexico’s Independence Day, Sep. 16, as it connects to a large number of the community’s heritage. 

Three Mariachi bands performed, with Mariachi Mi Tiera Linda giving tribute to the late Mexican musician Vicente Fernandez who passed on Dec. 21, 2021. The band performed Fernandez’s cover of Frank Sinatra’s “My Way,” singing both in English and Spanish. This song is famously associated with Fernandez and his overall impact on the world of Mariachi.

Young students also performed baile folklórico dances in their brightly colored traditional Mexican dresses. These dances are a mixture of Indigenous, African, and Spanish cultures, with heavy detail in footwork, facial expressions, and particular movements in the long flowy skirts. 

Davida Scott, a teacher at Hayward Adult School, wanted to give back to the young generation of students with a backpack drive at the event. Scott is the founder of Raising Leaders, a series of workshops focusing on “employability skills, financial awareness, career exploration, and educational opportunities.” The California Teachers Association stated on cta.org. 

This particular workshop was a student drive that consisted of 100 free backpacks, school supplies, and dental hygiene kits that Alameda County Supervisor Richard Valle funded. 

The event lasted until nine p.m., with the crowds reluctant to leave. City Councilmember Francisco Zermeño, who hosted the event, thanked everyone in attendance.

National Walk and Roll Day

By: Henry Hincapie

Staff Writer

“Walk and Roll to School Day” is an annual celebration that allows students, families, and caregivers to experience the benefits of exercise while teaching them proper pedestrian and road safety. The Hayward Police Department encourages parents and students to join their classmates and walk bike, or roll to class on Oct. 12. 

Hayward Police Sergeant Tasha DeCosta stated, “We hope this is a fun, rewarding experience for students and community members that shows how important it is for everyone to be safe walking, biking, or rolling.”

Hayward Police Department offers tips for students who walk, bike, or roll to school:

  • Plan your route on roads with sidewalks or paths away from traffic. If there are no sidewalks, walk or ride as far from cars as possible, facing traffic.
  • Use crosswalks, preferably at stop signs or signals. If there are unmarked crosswalks, cross at corners on streets with fewer lanes and lower speed limits.
  • Always look left-right-left before crossing the street. Continue to scan for traffic as you cross the street.
  • Watch for cars entering/leaving driveways or parking spaces.
  • Always wear a helmet when riding or rolling.
  • Be aware of your surroundings. Keep the earbud or headphone volume low enough to still hear around you.

On this day, drivers should be extra mindful of the increase in foot and bike traffic and be prepared to stop to accommodate the school buses and children making their way to school. As always, drivers should watch their speed when in school zones.

In order to track participation and show support for active, healthy, and safe transportation, schools are encouraged to register at walkbiketoschool.org. Here are some Chabot students’ thoughts on whether they plan on participating in this event.

Chabot Student Tony

Tony: “I did hear about this event through my high school. I plan on participating because I already walk or skate to school. It usually takes around 40 minutes to walk here and a lot shorter on my skateboard”

Many students do not plan on participating in this event due to the fact that they don’t have the means to join the event and the walking distance would be too long for them.

Chabot Student Bilal

Bilal: “I have not heard of National Walk and Roll day. I live an hour away and I don’t have a bike because it broke a while ago So, it wouldn’t be convenient.” 

This article has contributions from Mike Leonor and Kennedy Petty

Predator’s Newest Film

The newest film in the Predator series, Prey, was released Aug. 5 as a Hulu original starring Amber Midthunder and Dakota Beavers. Directed by Dan Trachtenberg and written by Patrick Aison, the film is set in the early 18th century in the Great Plains, where a young Comanche woman witnesses the crash landing of a spacecraft and sets out to prove herself as a hunter.

Prey differs from the rest of the Predator series as it predates the original films and consists almost entirely of Native American and First Nation actors and actresses. The casting of this film made it possible for more Indigenous talent to premiere on the big screen.

Naru, played by Amber Midthunder, is a healer who dreams of becoming a distinguished hunter like her older brother, Taabe, played by Dakota Beavers. While pursuing a deer in the forest with her dog, Naru witnesses what looks like a Thunderbird falling from the sky. She takes this as a sign to prove herself. She returns to her village to find out that one of the hunters was taken by a mountain lion. Naru insists on coming along with the search party to help track and provide medical care but soon comes across signs that something alien is out there.

After healing the hunter, she encounters the mountain lion on the tree branch but gets distracted by mysterious sounds and lights and falls, hitting her head. Naru becomes frustrated after her failed attempt to catch the mountain lion. Her brother is successful and is rewarded by the tribe, becoming War Chief. She wanders from her tribe to investigate. Meanwhile, a Predator hunts for a formidable opponent worthy of fighting.

The cinematography was simply beautiful, with panoramic shots of nature and ancient North American landscapes. The use of the landscape really sets the movie’s tone while following Naru’s growth and use of her surroundings.

The introduction of the Predator was epic, showing off his robustness and strength. His weaponry and use of limited technology showed how primitive and powerful the Predator can be without its traditional armor and weapons.

I would say the representation of the Comanche Nation was done well and with love from the people who all worked together on this film. I loved that they showed subtle nods toward the indigenous tribe, from the knowledge of medicine to crafting an arm stretcher out of wood and sticks.

Midthunder’s performance as Naru was refreshing because it differs from previous Predator films. She portrays Naru as a girl relying on her intellect and observation skills and using her surroundings to her advantage. There is no military, no advanced weaponry to eliminate alien creatures. There is just Naru simply being strategic and using her home-field advantage to defeat the Predator.

What surprised me about this movie was the actors did a Comanche dubbed version. I do not think this has ever occurred in a Hollywood film.

“I think this is the best Predator movie I have seen so far. One of the best in the series,” said Dr. Kim Morrison.

“I liked the fact this film wasn’t compared to the original franchise movies. It’s not male-dominated,” said librarian Eugenia Chan.

Fiona and Ian

Hurricane Fiona hit Puerto Rico as a Category 1 storm on Sept. 18 with historically large amounts of rainfall and shut down electricity on the island. Parts of Puerto Rico were hit with over 30 inches of rain, causing significant damage to bridges and roads from flooding and mudslides. 

Hurricane Fiona came five years after Hurricane Maria, a Category 4 storm that left nearly 3,000 people dead in 2017 and devastated the island’s power grid. Afterward, it took almost a year for electricity to be restored to all residents of Puerto Rico in 2018. 

At least 21 people have died from Fiona, according to the Department of Health in Puerto Rico. 

Gov. Pedro Pierluisi of Puerto Rico had asked Biden to prioritize rebuilding the island’s transportation infrastructure. 

“We want to be treated in the same way as our fellow Americans in times of need. All American citizens, regardless of where they live in the United States, should receive the same support from the federal government,” said Pierluisi. 

President Biden traveled to Puerto Rico on Oct. 2 and promised $60 million in hurricane relief funds from the federal government to help rebuild areas in Puerto Rico that Fiona hit.

As Puerto Rico slowly recovers from Hurricane Fiona, Florida was decimated by Hurricane Ian, a Category 4 storm. Many residents on the mainland and island communities were left without power, and many found themselves homeless. 

The current death toll from Hurricane Ian is 127 in Florida. Five deaths were attributed to the storm in North Carolina. 

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden traveled on Oct. 5, Wednesday, to survey the damage in Florida. 

Biden and Gov. Ron DeSantis put aside their political differences to work together on rescue and recovery efforts for the people of Florida. 

“I think he’s done a good job,” Biden said when asked about DeSantis’ response to the storm. 

Student Loan Forgiveness

On Aug. 24, the White House briefing room posted a news release stating that they plan on pushing forward a plan in regards to federal student loan forgiveness.

This historic plan will provide students with “$20,000 in debt cancellation to Pell Grant recipients with loans held by the Department of Education, and up to $10,000 in debt cancellation to non-Pell Grant recipients. Borrowers are eligible for this relief if their individual income is less than $125,000 ($250,000 for married couples).” Students will be able to apply for loan forgiveness starting on Oct. 1.

In addition to the loan forgiveness, President Biden has also announced that he plans to extend a pause on student loan payments until the end of December 2022.

Despite heavy support from students across the country, this plan has been met with reservations from several Republican figures. One outspoken voice has been Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene. During her on-air interview with Newsmax, Congresswoman Greene stated, “Taxpayers shouldn’t have to pay off the great big student loan debt for some college student that piled up massive debt going to some Ivy League school. That’s not fair.” 

In response to the statement made by Congresswoman Greene, the official White House Twitter page reposted a video of Congresswoman Greene speaking about her dismay of the student loan forgiveness and captioned it with “Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene had $183,504 in Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans forgiven.”

The White House Twitter also posted numerous republican figures who also stated their frustrations toward student loan forgiveness and the amount of PPP loans that have been forgiven for them as well.

On Monday, Sep. 13, Florida Gov. Rob DeSantis and 21 other Grand Old Party (GOP) senators released a joint letter asking President Biden to withdraw his student loan plan. “Simply put, your plan rewards the rich and punishes the poor,” They also stated that “College may not be the right decision for every American, but for the students who took out loans, it was their decision: able adults and willing borrowers who knowingly agreed to the terms of the loan and consented to taking on debt in exchange for taking classes.”

This statement comes after news broke that the GOP planned on blocking the student loan forgiveness plan. 

Despite pushback from GOP senators, the loan forgiveness plan has been a win for the Biden campaign in the eyes of many Americans, primarily students. UC Merced student David Gutierrez stated, “Loan forgiveness is a step in the right direction. These funds that will be allocated to students will directly help them, and myself, graduate from college debt free.” 

There have also been some students who recently took out loans that are worried about whether or not they will be able to receive help as well. CSU East Bay student Gary Alvarado stated, “ I think it should not be limited to previous loans accepted before June 2022. With our current state of the economy, it only puts those borrowers at a disadvantage.”

Women Warriors take the Screen

Courtesy of Sony Pictures

Director Gina Prince-Bythewood makes a comeback to the screen with her newest film The Woman King, starring Viola Davis, Lashana Lynch, Sheila Atim, Thuso Mbedu, and John Boyega. Inspired by historical events, Prince-Bythewood’s most ambitious project is about a group of women warriors defending the Western African kingdom of Dahomey during the 19th century.  The film premiered across the United States on Sept. 16. 

Prince-Bythewood is known for her other films featuring black women protagonists, such as The Secret Life of Bees and Beyond the Lights. Her previous film, The Old Guard, premiered on Netflix in July 2020 garnered much success. 

The movie starts off following the kingdom of Dahomey, what is now known as present day Benin, with an army of women warriors known as the Agojie. The Agojie are led by tough General Nanisca, played by Viola Davis, fighting against the soldiers of the Oyo Empire that have been attacking Dahomey villages to capture and sell slaves. King Ghezo, played by John Boyega, is provoked by the attacks and wants to fight against the Oyo. With rising tensions, Nanisca trains new recruitments for her female army. Among the new recruits is impulsive Nawi, played by Thuso Mdedu, who was sent to the Agojie as she did not want to marry someone who would beat her to obey. Veteran Agojie Izogie, played by Lashana Lynch, takes Nawi under her wing as she begins her training. As Nawi clashes with Nansica questioning her rules, she becomes a fearful warrior defending her kingdom and her kin. 

Davis’ performance as battle-scarred Nanisca may be her best yet. It was refreshing to see her play a complex character as a general. Not only because of her remarkable fight scenes and tough persona but also because of her intricate relationship with Nawi. Along with Davis’ acting being well received, Mbedu’s breakout role as Nawi was exciting, especially her friendship with Izogie. 

The cinematography was amazing and the fight scenes were fluid and attention grabbing. Davis’ fight scenes were compelling and evoked such raw emotions, she captured everyone’s attention on the screen. 

This film brought back Black actors together for the big screen once again. Prince-Bythewood directed a beautiful film that not only highlighted on black women and African culture, but about sisterhood, family, and self-discovery.

Minority Representation at the Emmys

Minority representation was a major theme in this years ‘2022’ Emmy awards with many actors and actresses making history in their respective categories.

“Squid Game” actor Lee Jung-Jae made history by becoming the first Asian actor to win outstanding lead actor in a drama series. “Thank you to director Hwang [Dong-hyuk] for the realistic problems we all face coming to life creatively on the screen with a great script and amazing visuals,” stated Lee while accepting his award.

Continuing their historic run, “Squid Game” director Hwang Dong Hyuk won Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series. This is the first time a non-English show has won in this category. Hwang stated in his acceptance speech, “People keep telling me that I made history, but I don’t think I made history by myself because it was you who opened up the doors for ‘Squid Game,’ inviting us here tonight at the Emmys. I have to say we all made history together. I truly hope that ‘Squid Game’ won’t be the last non-English series at the Emmys.”

Zendaya became the youngest actress to win two awards in the outstanding lead actress in a Drama series for her role in “Euphoria”. She won her first-ever Emmy in 2020 at the age of 24, which made history for the youngest winner at the time. In her acceptance speech, Zendaya expressed her gratitude towards the viewers of Euphoria. “My greatest wish for ‘Euphoria’ was that it could help heal people, and I just want to say thank you to everyone who has shared their story with me.”

She continued. “I want you to know that anyone who has loved a Rue (Zendaya’s character role) or feels like they are Rue, I want you to know that I’m so grateful for your stories, and I carry them with me, and I carry them with her.”

All eyes were on veteran actress Sheryl Lee Ralph as she delivered a moving speech for her first career Emmy win for her role in “Abbott Elementary” for best-supporting actress. Sheryl Lee is the second Black woman to receive this award. She started off her speech by singing “Endangered Species” by Dianne Reeves. “I am an endangered species, but I sing no victim’s song. I am a woman, I am an artist and I know where my voice belongs.”

She continued, “To anyone who has ever, ever had a dream and thought your dream wasn’t, wouldn’t, couldn’t come true, I am here to tell you that this is what believing looks like. This is what striving looks like. And don’t you ever, ever give up on you.”

Lead actress and writer of “Abbott Elementary” Quinta Brunson also took home her first ever Emmy win for outstanding comedy writer, making her the second black woman to win this award. Despite this being a huge achievement for Quinta, it was clouded by controversy.

While accepting her win for Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series, TV show host Jimmy Kimmel laid on the floor near her, acting as if he were unconscious. He continued to lay there for the entire speech. After the show, Quinta was asked about her thoughts on Kimmel’s actions. “I don’t know, I know Jimmy Kimmel. The bit didn’t bother me. Honestly, Jimmy gave me my first big late-night spot, he was one of the first people to see Abbott Elementary. He was the first person to message me on Instagram. He was so excited it was going to be on ABC. I was happy it was Jimmy. He’s one of the comedy godfathers. Tomorrow maybe I’ll be mad at him.”

Although Quinta was not bothered by Jimmy’s actions, it wasn’t well received by many people including her co-star Sheryl Lee Ralph. “I was like, ‘I wish that man would just get up off of the ground.’ And then I realized it was Jimmy Kimmel, and I was like, ‘Ooh, the disrespect, Jimmy!’ But that’s just me.” She continued, “I told him, too! To his face! And he understood.”

Ironically, Quinta was slated to appear on “Jimmy Kimmel Live” a few days after the Emmys. During the opening monologue of the show, Quinta came out and asked Jimmy if she could finish her speech. “So you know how when you win an Emmy, you only have 45 seconds to do an acceptance speech? It’s, like, not that much time. And then you get less time because someone does a dumb comedy bit that goes on a bit too long?”

After crashing Jimmy’s opening monologue, the two sat down for an interview where they addressed the situation. “People got upset. They said I stole your moment and maybe I did. And I’m very sorry if I did that. I’m sorry I did do that, actually. And also the last thing I would ever want to do is upset you because I think so much of you and I think you know that, and I hope you know that.”

Quinata accepted Jimmy’s apology, “Well, Jimmy, let me just say thank you. It is very kind of you to say that.”

She continued, “I honestly was in such a moment of just having a good time. Like, I won my first Emmy! I was up there, you know, happy, and I was wrapped up in the moment and just having a good time… I saw you and I saw Will Arnett and my Emmy and I’m like, ‘Oh my God! I’m having so much fun!’ But thank you, that’s kind. But honestly, I had a good night. I had a great night.” The two were able to bury the hatchet and put this situation behind them.

The hit show ‘Abbott Elementary’ showcases teachers trying to navigate their work life in an underfunded school. Earlier this year during an interview with NPR, Quinta announced that the ‘Abbott Elementary’ team and ABC planned on donating a portion of their marketing money to underfunded schools and teachers. It was later announced in a tweet by actress Yvette Nicole Brown that they donated the entire Emmy promotional budget. “Learning that the @AbbottElemABC team gave their entire #Emmy’s promotion budget to schools in need should tell you all you need to know to celebrate and support @quintabrunson and the show! #love.”

Season 2 of ‘Abbott Elementary’ premiered Sept. 21 on ABC

Chabot College under Process of Accreditation

Courtesy of ACCJC

Chabot College is in the process of accreditation, an evaluation review from institutional self-evaluation, and peer reviewers from the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges. The purpose of this evaluation is so the college can improve its educational process.

The ACCJC will hold sessions for the public on Oct. 11 from 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., and on Oct. 12, from 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. in the Event Center Building 700. The community is encouraged to share feedback about Chabot and hear the exit report

“We welcome our partnership with the ACCJC in our rigorous inquiry. Please join us in our open public forums, meet with our accreditation teams, and learn more about the accreditation process,” said Chabot President Dr. Susan Sterling. “Chabot is your community college, and I look forward to seeing you at one of our forums.”

The ACCJC focuses on community colleges in the state of California through the creation of standards and accreditation policies and also through a process of review by higher education professionals and public members as a part of the college. The purpose of this regional accreditation includes encouraging institutions, such as Chabot College, to strive for better academic quality, institutional effectiveness, and student success. 

Chabot emailed all students regarding the ongoing accreditation process and the public hearings on Monday. 

San Francisco City College lost accreditation from financial mismanagement and governance problems that directly impacted many students and staff nearly a decade ago. 

“I saw the email,” said Chabot College student Jared Bautista. “New students will have to find a new college to attend if we don’t pass.”

“Degrees could be nullified, and I would feel like my time was wasted,” said Chabot College student Andrea Magdaleno.