Author Archives: Elasha Young

About Elasha Young

Elasha Young, 31, journalist in the making.

R.I.P. Nipsey Hussle

For those who know of Ermias Asghedom better known to the world as Nipsey Hussle, your heart is in deep anguish. Hussle was more than just a Los Angeles “rapper.” He was a father, son, philanthropist, businessman and most importantly an activist on a mission to enlighten others.

Hussle, born Aug. 15, 1985, was tragically gunned down in front his store on Sunday, Mar. 31 in South Los Angeles, CA.

The Grammy-nominated Hussle began his career in 2005 releasing his first mixtape, titled “Slauson Boy Vol. 1,” which later became the name of his own recording label, one of his many businesses.

Nip, as many would refer to him, was a community ambassador who began his journey to better his community by giving back in many ways. He spent years reviving the Crenshaw Corridor food district and also donated a new pair of shoes to every student of 59th Street Elementary School and fostered repairs to the school’s playground structure.

With the community work Hussle put forth, he continued to put out music that connected to the community. He continued to spread greatness through his music and his activism.

In 2010, he was featured on the song “We Are the World 25 for Haiti,” and was selected to be the part of the XXL Magazine’s “Annual Freshman Top Ten,” a hand-picked selection of up-and-coming artists. XXL labeled Hussle “Most Determined” of his class, and LA Weekly called him the “next big L.A. MC.”

In 2013 Nipsey began dating Actress Lauren London who remained the love of his life throughout the years.

London posted several pictures of Hussle and herself on Instagram captioned “I am completely lost. I’ve lost my best friend, my sanctuary, my protector, my soul … I’m lost without you. We are lost without you, babe. I have no words.”

Hussle leaves behind his two children, daughter Emani and son Kross, his partner London, his brother Samiel (Blacc Sam) Asghedom and sister Samantha (Sammy) Smith.

The community has definitely lost an iconic figure who will be greatly missed among his peers and fans. The music industry will forever be missing a key named Nipsey Hussle.

Funeral arrangements are being held at Staple Center in Los Angeles, Thursday, April 11, 2019.

How to train a dragon: Bland

If you’re a fan of the “How to Train a Dragon” franchise you might be a little disappointed with this third installment “How To Train A Dragon 3: The Hidden World.” I’m not saying it’s a bad movie. A child would definitely love it. As for me, I feel it could have been better based on the length of time it took to create. Fans have been waiting for some time, and the 2019 release didn’t quite hit the mark.

I was expecting so much more, it felt like the movie was rushed and not finished. Some would go as far as to say they were ripped off.

Yes, it gives you valleys of entertainment and laughter, but it all just seemed to be missing some key components that I think would have made an enormous difference.

Jay Baruchel and America Ferrera make a dynamic duo as Hiccup and Astrid, soon to be the new clan leaders these two have their work cut out for them in this movie. They face a villain who reminds me of Count Dracula from Hotel Transylvania with a Hitler complex.

Grimmel the Grisly, played by F. Murray Abraham, is precisely what you see when you picture a villain tall, lanky, bossy, and cruel. Trying to wipe out all Night Furies, Grimmel sets his sights on Toothless, the last Night Fury and Hiccup’s best friend.

Jairon Williams, a 7-year-old, an attendee at the movie screening expressed how upset he was to know what Grimmel was trying to do. “He is a bad man, and he should go to jail,” Jairon says while looking up at his mom for confirmation.    

What I was expecting and what I got were polar opposites. I was hoping for this fantastic world of dragons, but only got seven minutes of the Hidden World when I feel they could have done a lot more. The only dragons that they really show are the same ones from the past movies and Netflix series.

Ashley Harrison, a 12-year-old moviegoer, was amazed by the graphics in the film but thought they could go a little deeper into all the different types of dragons. “I didn’t know what half the dragons were. I hope they come out with a book,” stated Ashley.

The movie did have some fantastic moments of suspense especially when they discovered a Light Fury. The love story between Toothless and the new Light Fury was quite epic if you speak dragon or understand the mating dance for dragons.

Hiccup’s mother Valka, played by Cate Blanchett, was present in this movie. Her role was not as prominent as it was in franchise’s sequel. She was a proud and helpful mother in this film. How they incorporated the clan of Berk was quite amazing. You get to see all the new personalities, not just Fishlegs, Snotlout, Ruffnut, and Tuffnut.

The How to Train Your Dragon Trilogy was a strong franchise, entertaining and family-oriented. It is a must-see but it’s a must see from the comfort of your own couch. It would be easier to digest the medium raw chicken they are serving in this movie. I’m not satisfied in the least.

Isn’t It Romantic? – Just a Cliché

The 2019 hit “Isn’t It Romantic” crosses all spectra of romantic comedies. Rebel Wilson and Adam DeVine give you a feeling of nostalgia with all the standard cliches most have seen for since the dawning of romantic comedies.

Todd Strauss-Schulson put his best foot forward on this film, it gives you all the things you associate with a romantic comedy. The basic stereotyped characters such as the competitive women in the workplace, shallow men who live in their perfect little bubble, and the flamboyant gay best friend are all used to make points about clichéd characterizations in other movies.

Wilson’s character Natalie is a New York architect that is convinced that happy endings don’t exist and romantic comedies are all a lie, which causes her to have little to no love in her life.  Day-to-day living is what Natalie is accustomed to and trying to make a name for herself at the architect firm.

DeVine’s character Josh is a project manager for the same architectural company. He is a fun loving free-spirit who just wants Natalie to give him a chance, but of course, Natalie friend-zoned him.  Josh is like the “Little Engine That Could” he never gives up.

“I know what’s going to happen because of these cliches, you can see it coming,” moviegoer Crystal Singh says. “I can’t help, but wonder which cliché it’s going to be.”

Being a cliché film you know everything is going to have a happy ending, but not before all the trials and tribulations that lead up to a massive chase and some sort of grand gesture.

That’s precisely what happens to Natalie when she tries to evade a mugger and runs smack dead into a subway pillar and knocks herself unconscious. And you guessed it, into a parallel universe where the grass is always greener.

Waking up in the hospital in a fancy room with a handsome doctor ironically named Dr. Hansom, played by Tom Ellis, Natalie finds everything is bright, beautiful, happy and PG-13 movie at it’s finest.

Natalie realized something is insanely wrong and must figure out how to rectify the situation so she can go back to her normal boring life. To break this curse, Natalie thinks she has to make someone fall in love with her, but it’s not that simple.

Not only does Natalie have to figure out how to get to her normal life back she realizes that everything that glitters isn’t gold.  Even when things seem like they couldn’t get any better.

This is especially true when gorgeous Isabella played by Priyanka Chopra falls for Josh after he saves her from choking and she has love at first sight moment, how ironic. This is when Natalie has a revelation that she has to make her handsome boss/client Blake played by Liam Hemsworth fall in love with her.

Blake goes from being a mean boss with an American accent who doesn’t take Natalie or take her work seriously and thinks she is a coffee girl at the firm to prince charming who seems like everything is peachy and perfect.

Kind of like the evil Prince Han in “Frozen,” Blake’s obnoxious, yet it’s not until he tries to steal Natalie’s idea that she sees the light and realizes that Josh is who she is in love with, but Josh is newly engaged to Isabella.

To get Josh to fall in love with her, she does everything she originally was against like singing karaoke in front of a crowd at Josh’s engagement party with a rendition of Whitney Houston’s “I Want To Dance With Somebody.” The group responds because everybody already knows the choreography.

That wasn’t enough to sway Josh to fall in love with her; the next best thing to do is stop the wedding, which she did, only to realize that she has to love herself. With this new outlook on life, she drives off, right into a pole.

Waking up in the world where she has her regular old life back Natalie starts taking charge of her life with new insight and realization that she is perfect the way she is.

Full of laughter and F-bombs “Isn’t It Romantic” is sure to be a blockbuster hit and it is a must watch but at home. Definitely a Netflix and chill type of movie.

Women’s History Month

In the United States, Women’s History Month traces its conception back to the very first International Women’s Day in 1911. In the 1970s, women’s history was practically a foreign topic in the K-12 curriculum or in society generally as far back as the woman suffrage movement in the 1840s. Bringing the empowerment of women to the forefront, the Education Task Force of the Sonoma County (California) Commission on the Status of Women initiated a “Women’s History Week” celebration for 1978.

By 1986, 14 states had already declared March as Women’s History Month. This momentum and state-to-state action were joined to lobby Congress to proclaim the whole month of March 1987 as National Women’s History Month.

A special Presidential Proclamation was issued by Ronald Reagan on March 1, 1988, stating “Women’s History Month is a time for us to recognize and salute women’s contributions to the American family and to society,” the proclamation honors the extraordinary achievements of American women all over the United States.

Students at Chabot expressed how excited they were for all the National Women’s Month and events that the school is hosting. One student, in particular, Nora Tillmen, third-year Chabot student has made it clear that it’s about time woman get the respect they deserve considering we all are just as capable. “I feel Chabot as a whole is putting an insane amount of time and effort into making this month mean something. I love it, and I feel special,” says Tillmen.

Chabot is a very diverse campus according to Institutional Research staff data provided by Chabot College. The gender breakdown as of Fall 2017 over 50 percent of the staff were women of all nationalities. Chabot has some of the most fantastic faculty I have ever met, and the fact that more than half are women is inspiring.

Sara Parker, Dean of Social Science at Chabot College has been with the school for the past 10 years, during eight of these years, she was a political-science professor. She chose to shift to administration. When you are seeing someone elevate themselves, you can’t help but want to be better and do better so you can feel that level of satisfaction. “Always do your best, work hard and work with integrity, and those things will serve you well and keep you moving forward,” Parker said when asked what the best advice she received in her career was.

Jennifer Lange, Life Science professor at Chabot College, has been a full-time instructor since 2006, but she has had the spirit of a teacher since birth. Being a woman in the science field is tough, being that it’s a male-dominated field.    

Lange states that National Women’s Month is the time we as women “Get to come out the shadows in a lot of places, that women might not receive recognition for. March is the Month to give women the credit they have always deserved and not received.”

Respect for the achievements, leadership, courage, strength, and love of the women who built America is as vital as that of the men whose names we know so well.